Top 10 Most Controversial Boxing Decisions Ever Made

May 20, 2021 By Admin


Top 10 Most Controversial Boxing Decisions Ever Made

It's no wonder that boxing has been the subject of so much public outrage and scandal: from doping to fixed fights to unconscionable decisions to the shadowy dealings of crooked promoters and our so-called sanctioning bodies. It has attracted immense criticism for some of the most controversial boxing decisions ever made in history.

The fight's decisions become corrupt and damage the reputation of boxing among the fans. Here we will discuss the most controversial boxing decisions ever made in history.

 

Most Controversial Boxing Decisions Of All Time | 2021 Updates

 

10. Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez (2004)
9. Tommy Hearns vs. Sugar Ray Leonard (1989)
8. Floyd Mayweather vs. Jose Luis Castillo (2002)
7. Tito Trinidad vs. Oscar Dela Hoya (1999)
6. Mike Tyson vs. Evander Holyfield II (1997)
5. Julio Cesar Chavez vs. Meldrick Taylor I (1990)
4. Sugar Ray Leonard vs. Roberto Duran II (1980)
3. Jack Dempsey vs. Gene Tunney II (1927)
2. Park Si Hun vs. Roy Jones Jr. (1988)
1. Muhammad Ali vs. Sonny Liston II (1965)

 

One of the most popular sports, boxing, has millions of fans worldwide. Since its inclusion as an ancient Olympic game, it has witnessed ever-increasing popularity throughout the world. But this game, too, also witnessed some of the most controversial decisions. And here they are!

 

10. Manny Pacquiao vs. Juan Manuel Marquez (2004)

The judge scored Pacquiao's first-round 7-10 for three rainouts rather than a 6-10. Boxing fans watched this epic rivalry started between Pacquiao and Marques in 2004. The mistake of the judge makes it one of the most controversial boxing decisions ever made in history.

The Filipino boxer came out strong in the first round, knocking Marquez down three times, and it didn't look like the fight would last much longer. But the wily Dinamita recovered quickly. During that controversial fight, Marquez discovered he couldn't use a shot-for-shot approach against Manny “Pac-Man” Pacquiao.

Then he developed a defensive, counterattacking style and has been using it ever since. Both boxers gave a stellar performance. Fans didn't know it at the time, but they were getting a taste of what is to come.

 

9. Tommy Hearns vs. Sugar Ray Leonard (1989)

Boxing fans were most interested in fights featuring the four top-flight riders of the '80s: Sugar Ray Leonard, Roberto Duran, Tommy Hearns, and Marvin Hagler. In 1989, lanky Tommy Hearn's Sugar Ray Leonard fought in an epic 12-round battle.

Sugar Ray Leonard fought twice against Tommy Hearns in this bout. Although he was on the edge of victory in round 7, he managed to come back and rock Tommy Hearns in round five. Also, in the last round, he displayed flashes of brilliance.

The unexpected judgment of an epic 12 round battle by juries makes this one of the most controversial boxing decisions ever. In the final round of voting, Sugar Ray Leonard won by a margin of 10-8, although no precipitation occurred.

 

8. Floyd Mayweather vs. Jose Luis Castillo (2002)

Regardless of the fact that the score after the bell read 116-111 once and 115-111 twice, detractors criticized Mayweather's victory for clearly losing points. An eight-month rematch was held at Mandalay Bay, and despite Floyd's apparent win, the cards were even closer.

Mayweather's undefeated record was maintained with scores of 116-113 twice and 115-113. The judges ruled unanimously twice, which makes this one of the most controversial boxing decisions ever made in history.

However, Castillo believes that he was the first to beat Mayweather, but the judges' decision was not in his favor. Needless to say, judges showed their trust in one of the richest boxers, Mayweather.

 

7. Tito Trinidad vs. Oscar Dela Hoya (1999)

On September 18, 1999, the WBC and IBF unified their Welterweight titles at Mandalay Bay Events Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. It was a tight fight that lasted twelve rounds before Trinidad was proclaimed the winner by majority decision which turned out to be one of the most controversial boxing decisions.

In this last so-called super fight of the 20th century, it pitted Mexican American Oscar De La Hoya, a Los Angeles native, against Puerto Rican Félix Trinidad, the former IBF world champion. Only the controversial nature of its scoring makes this bout memorable. 

In the end, Trinidad won by a 12-round majority decision, but for every fan who agrees with the verdict, few people say De La Hoya deserved to win.

 

6. Mike Tyson vs. Evander Holyfield II (1997)

The rematch between Holyfield and Tyson in 1997 went far beyond anyone's expectations. He pounded Tyson with body shots in the first round as Tyson ignored the boxing science his trainer had promised he would employ. The crowd began to chant Holyfield's name by the end of the first round, forcing Tyson's attention.

The second round saw Holyfield headbutt Tyson, opening a cut to his right eye. Things turn out to be super messy in the third round. Then Tyson lost whatever sanity he had left; he spits his mouthpiece out, bit down on the right ear of Holyfield, and then spit it out onto the canvas.

After a brief stoppage of the fight, it resumed, and then Tyson bit Holyfield's other ear. Tyson was disqualified with 10 seconds left in the third round, which turn this into one of the most controversial boxing decisions and matches. His $30 million purses were withheld while the Nevada boxing commission reviewed the fight.

 

5. Julio Cesar Chavez vs. Meldrick Taylor I (1990)

WBC light-welterweight world champion Julio Cesar Chávez and IBF light-welterweight world champion Meldrick Taylor endured a historic championship bout on March 17, 1990. There was no doubt that the thunderous punches of Chávez and the lightning-fast hands of Taylor would make for an exciting fight.

A huge right hand from Chavez sealed the bout's only knockdown. Taylor managed to get to his feet at six, and his trainer, Lou Duva, climbed onto the ring apron. During the match, Taylor's attention was distracted by Duva, who failed to respond to referee Richard Steele's "Are you okay?"

Steele immediately stopped the contest with exactly two seconds remaining on the clock, which became one of the most controversial boxing decisions. Throughout the history of boxing, the sudden stoppage of fights holds a special place among historians for it to undoubtedly be questioned and discussed in intensity.

 

4. Sugar Ray Leonard vs. Roberto Duran II (1980)

Leonard and Durán fought again after Leonard narrowly lost their first meeting (where Leonard brawled with Durán). This time Leonard moved more and repeatedly struck Durán. Durán struggled to keep up with Leonard and keep up with him.

Leonard had opened up to the crowd by the seventh round. A heated exchange in the eighth round ends with Durán turning his back on Leonard and allegedly saying, "No more" to the referee, although there has been some debate over whether that is actually what he said.

But because of this situation, many experts consider this one of the most controversial decisions in history.

 

3. Jack Dempsey vs. Gene Tunney II (1927)

Gene Tunney won the Long Count Fight, or the Battle of the Long Count, by a unanimous decision. It was a professional boxing match between a World Heavyweight Champion and a former champion. In the second round, Tunney was in control, but Dempsey smashed Tunney with a left hook that froze his legs.

A follow-up combination put Tunney on his backside, and ten seconds later, he was still on the canvas. During Tunney's knockdown in the seventh round, the count was delayed because Dempsey failed to land in a neutral corner.

Whether this delayed count affected the outcome is a subject of debate. Because of this, one of the most controversial boxing decisions, the Illinois State Athletic decreed the knockdown rule.

 

2. Park Si Hun vs. Roy Jones Jr. (1988)

Roy Jones Jr. fought Park Si Hun in 1988. Though he won the fight, one of the sport's worst and most controversial decisions eventually cost him his shot at the undisputed champion title.

After Park won his title fight against Roy Jones, Jr. by a 3–2 decision, later scoring revealed that Jones landed 86 punches to Park's 32. The following day, Jones apologized to Park.

Many journalists testified that Moroccan judge Hiouad Larbi acknowledged that Jones had won easily, but decided Park should be ruled the winner to appease South Korean viewers. A lifetime ban was ultimately imposed on two of the three judges who voted for Park, one of the most controversial boxing decisions.

 

1. Muhammad Ali vs. Sonny Liston II (1965)

This is one of the more controversial endings in boxing history. In the first round, One of the greatest boxers in history, Ali reportedly overpowered Liston with a fast right, knocking him down. Liston fell on his back, rolled over, and fell on his knee again.

As soon as Ali delivered the punch, the fight descended into disarray. Referee Jersey Joe Walcott, a former World Heavyweight Champion himself, had trouble convincing Ali to go to a neutral corner.

Ringside photographer Neil Leifer captured the moment as Ali gesticulated at his fallen opponent, screaming at him to get up and fight and, saying, "Get Up and Fight, nobody will believe this!". This unanimous defeat became one of the most controversial boxing decisions and one of the epic games ever made in history.

 

Final Words

We hope you liked the list of our most controversial boxing decisions list. If you want to add your precious opinion regarding this list, feel free to tell us in the comment box. We appreciate your feedback.

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